Candidate Experience with Recruiters is Just One Big Bad Date

Author Tasha Cluskey

I have been reading a lot of blogs and hearing a lot of people talk about how recruitment is like dating. Now as much as I disagree with this statement it is becoming a self-fulfilling prophecy in that these people seem to be trying to make it like dating. This has led to some down right annoying and creepy stuff going on out there that is making a dodgy Tinder date look more appealing than dealing with some recruiters right now.

So the first one, titles. The same people who like to talk about recruitment being like dating seem to have absolutely ridiculous job titles. Lots of people on dates like to exaggerate their job titles like saying “Former Pro Quarterback” when in reality your brother is a famous Quarterback and you played with him at school. Ok I stole that one from the Bachelorette but the point is you can say whatever you like but when people cut through the hype you just look like you’re hiding something.

“Dave Smith – Head of Talent Acquisition, Sourcing Ninja, Social Recruiting Strategist and Samurai Recruiter at Winter Court Consulting” I’m sorry, what?!

Don’t panic Dave wouldn’t get a job at Winter Court. Who are these people who are actually writing this on their LinkedIn! I love Game of Thrones but I have come to terms with the fact that I am not Daenerys Targaryen and now you need to come to terms with it too. You are not the Mother of Dragons, no one cares if you have 5 titles that all say you work in recruitment. Cut the bullshit.

Second point. Now I don’t know how to break this to you but stalking is super creepy. Yes that includes pre date stalking. Let’s err on the side of caution and just say all stalking is creepy. So many people, it would seem, are searching for candidates based on their interests and hobbies to find some common ground. Now I find this really strange but perhaps I don’t fully understand as apparently “Jagerbombing” isn’t a hobby – who knew? What I do know is if someone reached out to me and started chatting about my local pub or going to the gym or anything else I do without me telling them I do it I would block that creep and I would do it fast.

Now by no means am I saying there is anything wrong with being personal but maybe let’s stick to the things the candidates want you to know. If it is visible on their professional platforms then by all means crack on! If you’re stalking their private Facebook and Instagram accounts, maybe take a step back.

Don’t trick people into liking you or “smoke and mirrors” what you’re doing. You work in recruitment and hopefully you are damn good at what you do – so you have a good reason to message that person. You are not sitting there getting excited by a Java Developer because their Facebook told you they cycled 10 miles this weekend. Tell them the real reason you want to talk to them, tell them why you got excited looking at their profile. If you are passionate enough about your job it will show in your message regardless.

So basically stop trying to make recruitment like dating because you’re creating a truly awful date. You are not dating the candidate you are trying to recruit them. Also I’m no expert but probably don’t try to recruit a boyfriend/girlfriend either. Both sound weird.

  • Sussexmatt

    Yep, thoroughly agree. Though I think companies and employees should be cognisant of weekend language and incorporate that into discussions about their products and services they should know where the line is. I have seen a huge number of sourcers working on the principle that having a chat about everything you do outside work humanises them and the process in some way and for some jobs that does work for a part of the process. But, the average person looking for a job is doing just that, looking for a JOB. They are going through a long, difficult and draining process that is life altering. Recruiters, sourcers and hiring managers need to provide people with a framework that shows they are being taken seriously and a frame of reference that actually reflects their job.

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